Services

You can count on Newtown Medical Centre to not only meet, but exceed all your needs and requests. Learn more about the services we provide below, and let us know if you’d like more information about a specific offering!

X-rays

X-Ray Results

An X-ray is a common imaging test that’s been used for decades. It can help your doctor view the inside of your body without having to make an incision. This can help them diagnose, monitor, and treat many medical conditions.

Different types of X-rays are used for different purposes. For example, your doctor may order a mammogram to examine your breasts. Or they may order an X-ray with a barium enema to get a closer look at your gastrointestinal tract.

There are some risks involved in getting an X-ray. But for most people, the potential benefits outweigh the risks. Talk to your doctor to learn more about what is right for you.

CT Scans

A computerized tomography scan (CT or CAT scan) uses computers and rotating X-ray machines to create cross-sectional images of the body. These images provide more detailed information than normal X-ray images. They can show the soft tissues, blood vessels, and bones in various parts of the body. A CT scan may be used to visualize the:

  • head

  • shoulders

  • spine

  • heart

  • abdomen

  • knee

  • chest

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During a CT scan, you lie in a tunnel-like machine while the inside of the machine rotates and takes a series of X-rays from different angles. These pictures are then sent to a computer, where they’re combined to create images of slices, or cross-sections, of the body. They may also be combined to produce a 3-D image of a particular area of the body.

An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a simple test that can be used to check your heart's rhythm and electrical activity.

Sensors attached to the skin are used to detect the electrical signals produced by your heart each time it beats.

These signals are recorded by a machine and are looked at by a doctor to see if they're unusual.

An ECG may be requested by a heart specialist (cardiologist) or any doctor who thinks you might have a problem with your heart, including your GP.

ECG
 

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ULTRASOUND

An ultrasound scan is a medical test that uses high-frequency sound waves to capture live images from the inside of your body. It’s also known as sonography.

The technology is similar to that used by sonar and radar, which help the military detect planes and ships. An ultrasound allows your doctor to see problems with organs, vessels, and tissues without needing to make an incision.

Unlike other imaging techniques, ultrasound uses no radiation. For this reason, it’s the preferred method for viewing a developing fetus during pregnancy.

Surgical Procedures

Some of the most common surgical operations include the following:

  • Appendectomy. An appendectomy is the surgical removal of the appendix, a small tube that branches off the large intestine, to treat acute appendicitis. Appendicitis is the acute inflammation of this tube due to infection.

  • Breast biopsy. A biopsy is a diagnostic test involving the removal of tissue or cells for examination under a microscope. This procedure is also used to remove abnormal breast tissue. A biopsy may be done using a hollow needle to extract tissue (needle biopsy), or a lump may be partially or completely removed (lumpectomy) for examination and/or treatment.

  • Carotid endarterectomy. Carotid endarterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove blockage from carotid arteries, the arteries located in the neck that supply blood to the brain. Left untreated, a blocked carotid artery can lead to a stroke.

  • Cesarean section (also called a c-section). Cesarean section is the surgical delivery of a baby by an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus. This procedure is done when doctors determine it a safer alternative than a vaginal delivery for the mother, baby, or both.

  • Cholecystectomy. A cholecystectomy is surgery to remove the gallbladder (a pear-shaped sac near the right lobe of the liver that holds bile). A gallbladder may need to be removed if the organ is prone to troublesome gallstones, if it is infected, or becomes cancerous.

  • Dilation and curettage (also called D & C). A D&C is a minor operation in which the cervix is dilated (expanded) so that the cervical canal and uterine lining can be scraped with a curette (spoon-shaped instrument).

  • Free skin graft. A skin graft involves detaching healthy skin from one part of the body to repair areas of lost or damaged skin in another part of the body. Skin grafts are often done as a result of burns, injury, or surgical removal of diseased skin. They are most often done when the area is too large to be repaired by stitching or natural healing.

  • Hemorrhoidectomy. A hemorrhoidectomy is the surgical removal of hemorrhoids, distended veins in the lower rectum or anus.

  • Hysterectomy. A hysterectomy is the surgical removal of a woman's uterus. This may be done laparoscopically through an abdominal incision or vaginally. The ovaries may be removed at the same time.

  • Hysteroscopy. Hysteroscopy is a surgical procedure used to help diagnose and treat many uterine disorders. The hysteroscope (a viewing instrument inserted through the vagina for a visual exam of the canal of the cervix and the interior of the uterus) can transmit an image of the uterine canal and cavity to a television screen.

  • Inguinal hernia repair. Inguinal hernias are when the small intestine bulges through a weak area in the lower abdominal muscles. An inguinal hernia occurs in the groin. Surgical repair pulls the intestine back to its original location.

  • Low back pain surgery. Low back pain can have various causes, including abnormal development of the backbone, stress on the back, injury, or a physical disorder that affects the bones of the spine. Usually, surgery is not considered until other options have been exhausted, including rest, medication, and mild exercise. The type of surgery done on the back depends on the diagnosis.

  • Mastectomy. A mastectomy is the removal of all or part of the breast. Mastectomies are usually done to treat breast cancer. There are several types of mastectomies, including the following:

    • Partial (segmental) mastectomy, involves the removal of the breast cancer and a larger portion of the normal breast tissue around the breast cancer.

    • Total (or simple) mastectomy, in which the surgeon removes the entire breast, including the nipple, the areola (the colored, circular area around the nipple), and most of the overlying skin, and may also remove some of the lymph nodes under the arm, also called the axillary lymph glands.

    • Modified radical mastectomy, in which the surgeon removes the entire breast (including the nipple, the areola, and the overlying skin), some of the lymph nodes under the arm, and the lining over the chest muscles. In some cases, part of the chest wall muscles is also removed.

  • Partial colectomy. A partial colectomy is the removal of part of the large intestine (colon) which may be done to treat cancer of the colon  or inflammatory conditions such as ulcerative colitis or diverticulitis.

  • Prostatectomy. The surgical removal of all or part of the prostate gland, the sex gland in men that surrounds the neck of the bladder and urethra--the tube that carries urine away from the bladder. A prostatectomy may be done for an enlarged prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or if the prostate gland is cancerous.

  • Tonsillectomy. The surgical removal of one or both tonsils. Tonsils are located at the back of the mouth and help fight infections

A physical examination helps your PCP to determine the general status of your health. The exam also gives you a chance to talk to them about any ongoing pain or symptoms that you’re experiencing or any other health concerns that you might have.

A physical examination is recommended at least once a year, especially in people over the age of 50. These exams are used to:

  • check for possible diseases so they can be treated early

  • identify any issues that may become medical concerns in the future

  • update necessary immunizations

  • ensure that you are maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine

  • build a relationship with your PCP

Physical Examination

Doctor's Appointment

Endoscopy

Endoscopy is the insertion of a long, thin tube directly into the body to observe an internal organ or tissue in detail. It can also be used to carry out other tasks including imaging and minor surgery. Endoscopes are minimally invasive.

Surgeons in Operating Room